Press

Most notable of all, though, is Meyer’s bravura playing…..is by turns fierce and lyrical.

The Strad

…I was also struck by ‘Through Which We Flow,’ a new 15-minute work for strings by Jessica Meyer, a Novus violist. Its departure point was the lovely sound of works like the Dvorak and Tchaikovsky serenades, which Ms. Meyer quickly complicated, by dividing and redividing lines, and roughed up with astringent effects, like a creaking and croaking among the double basses midway through, which was then offset by squealing violins.

New York Times: This Week’s 8 Best Classical Music Moments

Meyer has made a name for herself with her intricate, solo loopmusic, its intertwining themes and atmospheric electronic effects. That influence was apparent in the work’s subtle thematic shifts, intricately circular motives and rhythmic persistence, not unlike Julia Wolfe. But freed from the confines of the loop pedal, Meyer’s mini-suite flowed carefully and methodically from rapt, mantra-like permutations, through grim insistence to a peacefully hypnotic ending. All this demanded plenty of extended plucking and percussive technique, and the ensemble rose to the challenge. It’s the best thing Meyer’s ever written: there isn’t a string orchestra on the planet that wouldn’t have a field day playing this.

Lucid Culture

‘Forgiveness’ for bass clarinet and loop pedal, by Jessica Meyer…made the strongest impact. In this work, the loop pedal records and repeats sounds from both the musician and his instrument, resulting here in an evocative dialogue. Mr. Fingland’s deep breaths and sighs became a backdrop for long, sustained notes, the plaintive clarinet utterances unfolding over what sounded like a chorus of gentle sobs. The klezmer-tinged line increased to what seemed like a frantic plea for forgiveness — a multilayered journey through grief, anger and catharsis.

The New York Times

Meyer is a talented composer….reaching for something new and unknown.

New York Classical Review

A world premiere of “The Last Rose,” by Jessica Meyer (b. 1974) who was in the audience, reached one of the evening’s high points. The fearless doubler, soprano/cellist Sarah Brailey made of it something truly affecting. Its text, “Tis the Last Rose of Summer,” by Thomas Merton, was illustrated cleverly by the cello.

Boston Musical Intelligencer

A world-premiere ensued; how many times do you encounter that at an art song recital?… Ms. Meyer uses both extended and traditional techniques in her music, drawing on her years of experience as a professional violist. The most haunting of these, for me, was her gentle drumming on her instrument…

New York Concert Review

The pieces were colorful, and the contemporary twists of music with Shakespeare’s words showed their timelessness.

East Hampton Star

The loop pedal allows her to multiply her gorgeous, expressive tone, and the delicately layered textures blend to create an ambient one-woman orchestra. Throughout the album, her viola paints beautiful soundscapes of surprisingly varied colors and timbres.

Second Inversion, Album of the Week

An intriguingly vivid new solo electroacoustic album…Meyer often creates the effect of a one-woman orchestra…

Lucid Culture

Meyer’s album is a true contribution to the repertoire of programmatic music, providing a soundscape to the abstract musings we experience every day…Just as the human psyche is prone to conflict, chaos, and occasional harmony, its musical representation, envisioned by Meyer, is a resounding potpourri of styles.

I Care If You Listen

…two of the festival’s most alluring programs are recitals by string players who also compose.

The New York Times

Mr. Boyce composed “Deixo | Sonata” (2009) for the ensemble’s violist Jessica Meyer… Ms. Meyer and Mr. Beck played the piece with the kind of polish, focus and excitement that you would expect in a firmly settled repertory piece.

The New York Times

Jessica Meyer… gave a focused, beautifully centered account of Krzysztof Penderecki’s unaccompanied Cadenza.

The New York Times

Violist Jessica Meyer…brought out the colourful palette and visceral energy of Moto Osada’s Kaguyama Dance.

The Strad

© Copyright2017 - Jessica Meyer | Composer, Violist, Educator